Hello friends! I’m back with another tutorial for you. This time I’m showing you how to make a facing for the tie waist version of the Hana Tank pattern (Version C).

This facing finish is ideal if you are using a finicky fabric that won’t easily turn under for the narrow hem as instructed in the pattern. It is also great if you are using a patterned fabric that only has the pattern on one side, leaving the wrong side lighter and looking like the wrong side when the ties are knotted.

Here’s how to do it!

STEP 1: Cut the main bodice pieces

Cut your main bodice pieces for the front and back of Version C from the pattern. When you cut the back bodice, add 1/2” to the hem (this will make sense later, hang with me). If sewing a placket, prep the placket first as instructed. Then sew the bust darts.

STEP 2: Create the facing pieces

Using the pattern as a guide, create a pattern piece that incorporates the ties and extends about 1.5” above the hem line. You only need to create the facing for the front piece. You can trace this from your original pattern, or re-print the pattern and cut it into the facing piece by chopping off the bodice.

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NOTE: I decided to make Version C without the button placket. I cut two pieces because I was short on fabric and had to do some creative pattern placement to get the pieces to work with what I had. I added 1/4” at the center for a seam allowance to piece them together, but normally, I would have just cut one continuous piece.

If you are sewing the button placket, you would cut two pieces just like these, with the center front stopping right at the ‘Center Front’ line on the pattern. You’ll prep the button placket as instructed in the pattern before attaching the facing (and the center front of the facing will be concealed under the placket when finishing).

STEP 3: Prepare the facing hem

Press the top edge of the facing by 1/2” once to the wrong side.

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STEP 4: Sew the facing to the bodice

Lay the bodice face up and then lay the facing on top face down, right sides together, and align the ties. Pin in place.

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Starting at one side, sew the the hem and ties around the bottom edge with a 1/2” seam allowance. Trim the seam allowance to about 1/4” and clip into the curves to make turning easier. Also trim the corner of the ties to reduce bulk in the point when it is turned right side out. Be careful not to clip the seam.

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STEP 5: Turn the ties right side out

Press the seams open all along the sewn edge, then turn the ties right side out and press flat. Make sure you really poke out the tie corners and curves. You may need to use a turning tool.

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STEP 6: Sew the shoulders and side seams

Sew the seams as instructed in the patterns (or using your preferred seam finish). When you sew the side seams, open the bottom facing seam and align with the back bodice side seam. Press the seams to the back.

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NOTE: I got a little ahead of myself on this step, so I had topstitched the ties too soon and had to unpick them here. Learning as I go! :)

STEP 7: Prepare the back bodice hem

Fold the back hem up by 1/2” to match the hem fold of the front tie facing. Then fold the back again by 1/2” to match the bottom seam where the facing attaches to the bodice. When everything is folded in place, you will have a hem fold that continues to the front facing.

STEP 8: Topstitch the ties and the hem

Topstitch around the perimeter of the ties with a narrow hem, about 1/16” to 1/8”. You can continue the topstitching to the fold of the back hem if you like. Then topstitch the hem in place around the entire perimeter of the front and back bodice.

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All done! Now your ties will have a finished look on the front and back and look extra neat when tied.

Also check out the tutorial on creating an all-in-one facing for the neckline and armholes using the burrito method here and how to make and sew bias binding like a pro here!

Purchase the Hana Tank + Dress PDF Pattern

September 21, 2020 — Casey Sibley